What is Yoga Therapy? – Yoganandham

What is Yoga Therapy? – Yoganandham

yoga therapy training in Rishikesh - YoganandhamAn Introduction to Yoga Therapy

Yoga therapy utilizes poses, breathing techniques, and meditation to benefit and improve overall health.

While any type of yoga can bring health benefits, yoga therapy involves employing a variety of yoga practices to try to improve a health condition or to ease a natural process, such as pregnancy or menopause. Among the yogic tools used therapeutically are asana (the physical postures), Pranayama (breathing exercises), meditation, and guided imagery. Although many people don’t realize it, yogis also consider diet an integral part of yoga and therefore of yoga therapy.

Why Yoga?

Therapeutic yoga is an inherently holistic approach, simultaneously working on the body, mind, and spirit. Various yoga practices systematically strengthen different systems in the body, including the heart and cardiovascular system, the lungs, muscles, and the nervous system. Yoga practices can improve the function of the digestive system, foster psychological well-being, and improve oxygen delivery to tissues. Yoga also can help the body more efficiently remove waste products, carcinogens, and cellular toxins.

Most people in the West live stressful lives, and yoga—and by extension yoga therapy—is perhaps the best overall stress reduction system ever invented. Stress has been linked to a wide variety of medical problems, from migraine headaches and irritable bowel syndrome to potentially life-threatening conditions such as diabetes, osteoporosis, and heart disease. Since persistently high levels of stress hormones, particularly cortisol, can undermine the function of the immune system, here too yoga can help.

While yoga by itself can alleviate a number of problems, it is particularly effective as a complement to other forms of health care, both alternative and conventional. Studies suggest, for example, that yoga therapy can lessen the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation treatments for people with cancer and facilitate faster recovery after bypass surgery. In clinical trials, many patients with asthma, type II diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset diabetes), or high blood pressure who began a regular practice of yoga were able to either lower their drug dosage or eliminate some pills entirely. Less medication means fewer side effects, and, sometimes, very substantial cost savings.

Yoga Is a Slow Medicine

While yoga is strong medicine, in general, it is slow medicine. The key to successful yoga therapy is an incremental approach, which tends to be safer and more effective than more aggressive strategies. It is best to begin yoga [therapy] as medicine slowly and ramp up the intensity and duration of practice only as circumstances allow. For some students, particularly those with serious medical problems, therapeutic yoga might begin with only a posture or two, or a single breathing exercise, until the student is ready for more.

In any yoga therapy session, ideally, you only want to teach a student as much as they are going to be able to practice at home. Better to teach a few things well than to have them try to do more with less precision. An exception to this rule would be when you teach a specific series of practices in one session in order to teach the student to relieve a current symptom, with only a small portion of the total practice assigned as homework. More experienced students, of course, may be able to handle much more.

If you have any question or queries you can contact us click here

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s